IMF Kutná Hora 2017

Sunday / August 29 / 3 p.m. / Church of the Annunciation of the Virgin Mary in Bohdaneč near Kutná Hora

PAPA HAYDN

Joseph Haydn:  Quartet for Flute, Violin, Viola and Cello in D Major, No. 1, Op. 5/1, Hob II/D9

I. Presto assai
II. Adagio
III. Menuetto
IV. Presto

Jana Semerádová – flute, Helena Jiříkovská – violin, Jiří Kabát – viola, Jiří Bárta – cello

Joseph Haydn: Trio for Flute, Violin and Cello “London” No. 3 G Major, Hob. IV

I. Spiritoso
II. Andante
III. Allegro

Jana Semerádová – flute, Helena Jiříkovská – violin, Jiří Bárta – cello

Joseph Haydn:  Quartet for Flute, Violin, Viola and Cello in D major, No. 5, Op. 5/5, Hob II/D11

I. Presto
II. Menuetto
III. Adagio
IV. Presto assai

Jana Semerádová – flute, Helena Jiříkovská – violin, Jiří Kabát – viola, Jiří Bárta – cello

 

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The music of Joseph Haydn (1732–1809) epitomizes the spirit of  the Classical era, with its emphasis on flawless harmony, equlibrium, and a positive, even joyous message. Though this Austrian composer (who spent part of his life in what is now the Czech Republic) wrote serious sacred and symphonic opuses, his output also includes more than a few compositions which can be bracketed as “Gebrauchsmusik”, or “utility music”, destined primarily for entertainment and distraction on a wide variety of public occasions. This applies to his many different divertimenti, cassations, serenades or minets, and also to the flute quartets and trio featuring in tonight´s programme. Once, late in his life, Haydn made it known that “It was only as an old man that I learned to write music for woodwind – and now that I have come to terms with these instruments I am supposed to bid farewell to this world?!” Without in any way underestimating his early works, it is true that the development of Haydn´s compositional idiom documents the uninterrupted process – also under the influence of Mozart, who was his junior – of his artistic progress towards the ultimate mastery. His was a period when composers parted ways with the one-time practice of general bass performed by cello and harpsichord (here a fine example is offered by the programme of this festival´s fifth concert), instead trying to realize their musical ideas with the use of four autonomous voices. It was also then that the genre of quartet was assigned its stable format of two fast outer movements, interposed between which are a lyrical adagio and a spirited minuet.

Haydn´s interest in the flute dates from later on, the time of his visits to London. Its popularity there was huge, and Haydn responded to the promise of new commissions by writing for two English noblemen, the Earl of Abingdon and Baronet Willoughby Ashton, his Opus 5, consisting of quartets with flute and flute trios.

sleeve-note: Dita Hradecká / translation: Ivan Vomáčka

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